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Not sure of your zone?
Zone Hardiness Chart

By clicking on the plant name you can see a photos of the plants
Use your [BACK] button to return to this list.
Sun Full day of sun
1/2 Day At least a ½ a day of sun, but can take a full day of sun.
Shade Tolerates Shade very well
(Bright Light with no direct Sun)

These plants are considered hardy for the zone that is listed after each variety name. If you are for instance in zone 7 like I am, any plant that has a zone number 7or less will be hardy in my pond.

The following chart will tell you which plants can be left in your pond for the winter if you do not add salt to your pond. If you add salt please refer to this link salt test results for the list of plants and how much salt they can tolerate.

If you do add salt, simply remove the plant from the pond and plant in your flower garden for the winter if it is hardy for you. You can then dig it up once it starts to grow in the spring. Re-pot it in ordinary garden soil. Cover top of the soil with gravel and return it to the pond in the spring. Simply replace it back in the pond at the proper depth. OR you may bring the plant inside to a cool but above freezing area. Some will require a dormancy period and if you can store then at about 55*, that would be ideal.

Some of the plants on this part of the list and the list that says tropical shallow water plants can be grown inside for the winter, too. Plants like Umbrella, Papyrus, Water Celery, Hardy Orchid Arrowhead, and all the Taros are great examples. They do not need to be submerged either! Purchase trays (a kitty liter pan works great) and place the plants in the tray and keep a couple of inches of water in the tray at all time. Keep the tray in front of a sunny window until the water warms enough for them to go back into the pond in the spring.

This next group of plants is "lumped" together because they like 0" to 6" of water over the top of the pot. Specifically, that means that the water can be level with the top of the pot and up to 6" over the top of the pot.
 

Arrowhead Zone 4 Sun 1/2day
Arum, bog Zone 3 Sun
Arrow Arum Zone 5 Sun 1/2 day
Bluebells Zone 8 Sun
Blue Eyed Grass Zone 3 Sun 1/2 day
Bog Bean Zone 3 Sun 1/2 day
Bog Lily Zone 7 Sun 1/2 day
Calla Zone 10 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Cat Tails all varieties Zone 3 Sun 1/2 day
Creeping Jenny Zone 3 Sun
Forget-me-not NOTE keep water level with the top of the pot Zone 3 Sun 1/2 day
Four Leaf Clover Zone 7 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Houttuynia Ghost plant, Chameleon Zone 6 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Iris Louisiana Zone 4 Sun 1/2 day
Lavender musk Zone 3 Sun
Lizards tail Zone 4 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Lobelia    
Cardinal Flower Zone 4 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Blue Knight Zone 4 Sun 1/2 day
*Loosestrife Zone 3 Sun 1/2 day
Manna grass Zone 5 Sun 1/2 day
Marsh marigold Zone 3 1/2 day Shade
Pennywort Zone 6 Sun 1/2 day
Pitcher Plant Zone 7 Sun 1/2 day
Primrose creeper Zone 8 Full ½ day
Rain Lily Zone 7 Full
Rush    
Blue Zone 6 Full 1/2day
Common Zone 6 Full 1/2day
Corkscrew Zone 6 Full 1/2 day
Flowering Zone 5 Sun
Green Zone 5 Full 1/2 day
Horsetail Zone 5 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Spike Zone 6 Sun 1/2 day
Stripped Zone 7 Sun 1/2 day
Zebra Zone 6 Sun 1/2 day
Spider Lily    
Spearwort Zone 5 Full
Swamp hibiscus NOTE keep water level with the top of the pot Zone 4 Full
Sweet Flag Zone 4 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Thalia Dealbata Zone 7 Sun 1/2 day
Umbrella Palm Zone 8 Full 1/2 day Shade
Water Canna Zone 8 Full
Water Celery Zone 6 Full 1/2 day Shade
Water Celery variegated Zone 6 Full 1/2day Shade
Water Cress Zone 4 1/2 day Shade
Water Mint Zone 6 Full 1/2 day
Water Plantain Zone 5 Full
Water Willow Zone 4 Full

*NOTE the sale of some varieties of Loosestrife is banned in some states.

This next group of plants is "lumped" together because they like 0" to 6" of water over the top of the pot. Specifically, that means that the water can be level with the top of the pot and up to 6" over the top of the pot. These require warmer climates, high zone numbers to be left in the pond over the winter.
 

This group of plants only likes 0" to 4" of water over the top of their pots. Most are only hardy to zone 8. They can be brought in the house for the winter and treated like a houseplant. Place in a sunny window and keep the soil moist.

I like to use a clear plastic liner under the plant that I keep full of water at all times. A pretty bowl or dish will work equally as well.

Tropical shallow water plants are very sensitive to cold temperatures, so be sure to wait until the water is warmed up and danger of frost is past before returning them to the pond in the late spring.

The tropical shallow water plants are some of my favorite plants. I love the showy leaves of the Taro, especially the black variety. My water gardens always include Water Canna and Stargrass because I like how they bloom most of the summer.
 

Bluebells Zone 8 Sun
Bog lily Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Calla lily Zone 10 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Canna water varieties    
All Longwood varieties Zone 8 Sun
Native yellow Zone 8 Sun
Papyrus Zone 8  
Giant Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Dwarf Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Egyptian Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Pickerel rush    
Giant, Giant white Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day
Singapore Pink Zone 3 Sun 1/2 day
Royal Zone 7 Sun
Giant purple Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day
Sensitive plant Zone 8 Sun
Star grass Zone 8 Sun
Taro
Black Taro Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day
Green Taro Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Imperial Taro Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day
Red stemmed Taro Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day
Thalia Zone 8 Sun
Umbrella palm Zone 8  
Umbrella palm dwarf Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day Shade

Lily-like aquatics like 6" to 12" of water over the top of the pot. They all have one thing in common: their leaves float out over the top of the pot and across the water, giving an air of elegance to the pond. Thus the category name, lily-like aquatics. The flowers are very unusual and elegant looking. Most have very unusual leaves. In zones where they are not hardy they can be brought inside the home for the winter. Place them in a deep container that has no holes so that the leaves can float away from the plant.
 
Banana Lily nymphoides aquatica Zone 8 Sun
Floating Heart nymphoides peltata Zone 7 Sun
Water Hawthorne Zone 5 Sun
Nymphoides cristatum Zone 7 Sun
Nymphoides geminata Zone 7 Sun
Nymphoides indica Zone 7 Sun
Nymphoides Ssp. (water fringe) Zone 7 Sun
Water Poppy Zone 7 Sun
Venezuelan Zone 7 Sun

This group of plants, know as floaters, do exactly what the name implies. They float on top of the water. The are great nutrient-eating plants and no pond is complete without them. Bring them in the house in the northern climates if they are not hardy for you. You can simply float them in water for the winter in a sunny window where they may continue to bloom for the winter. These plants do need sun and warmth in the winter months so put them in the warmest area of your home.
 
Azolla fairy moss Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day some Shade
Duckweed Zone 5 Sun 1/2 day
Frog bit Zone 7 Sun
Parrots feather Zone 6 Sun 1/2 day Shade
Water hyacinth Zone 8 Sun 1/2 day
Water lettuce Zone 9 1/2 day Shade
Water velvet (salvinia) Zone 8 Sun 1/2day

This group of plants helps put oxygen in the water. They help in algae control buy using the nutrients that the algae feed on. They are great plants to have in the pond, as this is where the fish usually spawn. These are generally inexpensive plants to replace every year is they are not hardy for you.
 
Anacharis Zone 5 Sun
Cabomba Zone 7 Sun
Hornwort/Foxtail/Coontail Zone 5 Sun
Parrots feather Zone 6 Sun

I have not included lilies in this list because all hardy lilies are hardy to zone 3 and tropical lilies are hard to zone 8. 

Tropical lilies can be over winterized as described under Tropical Shallow Water plants.

Lotus can be dropped to the bottom of the pond or brought inside and stored at around 55* to induce dormancy. They do need a dormant period in order to bloom their best the next year.

This zone hardiness chart is believed to be accurate. The severity of the winter could be a factor in hardiness. To be sure, subtract 1 number for your zone and they should be very safe for you to leave in your pond.

 
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